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5 Cat FAQs

Curious about cats and how to care for them? Let our experts help.
Here are just five of the questions we’re often asked by cat owners.

1. Should I give my cat wet or dry food?

Both! Dry foods are great for cats’ mouths and teeth and food with a
higher water content helps to keep your cat hydrated. As you’ll read
below, meat provides vital nutrients too.

2. Can my cat be a vegetarian?

Unfortunately not. Cats are known as ‘obligate carnivores’, which
means they depend on an essential amino acid called Taurine, found
in meat. A vegetarian diet would be very dangerous for your cat’s
health. If you’ve got your heart set on a veggie pet, a cat’s not for you.

Dudley 3

3. Why do I need
to watch my cat’s
weight?

If your cat puts on a lot
of weight and becomes
obese it can be very
dangerous for their health.
Just like in humans, it
can increase the risk of
diabetes, put stress on
their joints, decrease
immune function and lead
to heart problems. If you’re
worried that your cat is
piling on the pounds, ask
your vet for help.

 

4. I’m a keen gardener – but will any of my plants
harm my cat?

Unfortunately, some plants can be dangerous for cats. Be sure to
research what plants are safe for cats before planting them in your
garden or bringing them into your house.

Here are a few examples of plants you should keep cats away
from:

Lilies – although popular in bouquets and flower arrangements, they
are very dangerous for cats
Geraniums – can cause skin irritation
Daffodils – if your cat eats any part of a daffodil they may get
very poorly.

5. We’re having a baby – how can I prepare my cat?

A new baby can be a bit daunting for your cat – especially if they’ve
been the baby of your family until now! The best way to help your cat
adjust is to do so gradually. Bring baby things into the house slowly,
giving the cat a chance to investigate and accept them as part of
your home.

You can also help by making the new things smell familiar. Do this
by allowing your cat to rub its cheeks on the new baby’s items. This
will transfer facial pheromones that only your cat will be able to smell,
helping them feel safe and secure.